Faith and Belief and Religious Observances 2021-22

This calendar was created to highlight the wide diversity of holiday, belief and faith traditions being celebrated by University of Lincoln students, staff and in our community. It serves as an evolving resource to meet the needs of faith and belief literacy on UoL campus.

Many UK public holidays coincide with religious festivals and holiday arrangements. As part of our commitment to promoting equality, the University aims to take into account a diverse range of religious festivals when planning events and activities.

The religious festivals calendar lists a selection of holidays and festivals which take place throughout the academic year. These dates have been selected based on their significance within the diverse range of religions represented within University of Lincoln.

The Calendar indicates if a particular festival involves fasting or a restriction of work, in order to highlight dates that are likely to have a particular impact on participation or attendance.

University departments are encouraged to consider the festivals calendar when planning major events.  There are a range of ways in which the festivals calendar can be used to inform the planning of inclusive events, including:

  • Scheduling events to avoiding particular times or days.
  • Ensuring participants are aware of University facilities such as Quiet Spaces for prayer and reflection.
  • Arranging alternative ways of participating in the event e.g. through making resources available online.
  • Referring students and staff to the UOL Multi-Faith Chaplaincy or Student Societies who may host events to make particular religious festivals.

 This resource has been developed as part of the UOL Religious Literacy Programme by the Multi-Faith Chaplaincy and with approval from the Faith Advisory Board.

Faith and Belief Calendar 2021 – 22

 This  calendar is a resource designed to encourage public awareness of the great mixture of religious and ethnic groups that live in the university community.  However, because of the large number of religious, ethnic and cultural groups who are studying at the university, this resource cannot provide an exhaustive list for all of our faith traditions at the university.

Many people may find the calendar helpful as it identifies opportunities for discussion about different religious and faith practices.  It also serves as a reminder of those religious observances that many may wish to attend, and therefore can aid in the planning and scheduling of events and meetings.

 

Sun 15th Aug

 

Dormition of the mother of God  | Orthodox

Celebrate the dormition of the Most Holy Mother of God. The feast precedes a period of 15 days strict fasting.

 

 

Sun 19th Sep Anant Chaturdashi  | Jain

Anant Chaturdashi is a festival observed and celebrated by Jains and Hindus. Chaturdashi is the 14th day of the lunar fortnight. In the normal course, Anant Chaturdashi falls 10 days after Ganesh Chaturthi.

 

 

Mon 6th Sept – Wed 8th Sept

 

Rosh Hashanah | Jewish  * Holiday with work restriction  Jewish New Year, commemorating the creation of the world. A two-day festival during which work is not permitted.

 

Tue 14th Sept

 

The Exaltation of the Holy Cross  | Christian  

In memory of the exhalation of the Holy Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ by emperor Constantine following excavations at the site of crucifixion at Golgotha.

 

 

Tue 22nd Sept

 

Autumn Equinox  | Pagan

Celebrated when day and night are of equal duration.

 

Wed 15th Sep –  Thu 16th Sep

 

Yom Kippur |  Jewish  * Fasting * Holiday with work restriction 

Yom Kippur is often considered the holiest day of the year within the Jewish faith, and the day is dedicated to atonement and abstinence. Fasting before sundown until after sunset.

 

 

Mon 20th Sep – 

Mon 27th Sep

 

Sukkot |  Jewish   * Holiday with work restriction  

A week-long celebration which begins with the building of Sukkah. The work restriction for Sukkot is for the first two days and the last day.

 

Thu 7th Oct –

Fri 15th Oct

 

Navratri | Hindu   

Hindu Festival of the divine mother honouring Durga, wife of Shiva, and seeking her blessings. Also observed as a celebration recalling the days of Lord Krishna

Sun 31st Oct –

Mon 1st Nov

Samhain | Pagan

Pagan feast of the dead and old Celtic New Year.

Sun 31st Oct –

Mon 1st Nov

Samhain | Pagan

Pagan feast of the dead and old Celtic New Year.

Thu 4th Nov   Diwali (Deepavali) | Hindu   

(A five day festival of Light) 

General Practices: Lighting oil lamps and candles, setting off fireworks, and prayer. Celebrated by Hindus, Sikhs and Jains. 

 

Sat 6th Nov –

Sun 7th Nov

Birth of Baha’u’llah | Baha’i

Commemorates the birth of the founder of the Baha’i faith in 1817.

Mon 18th Nov  –

Tue 19th Nov

Mawlid Al -Nabi | Muslim

Birthday of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon Him), ca. 570 C. E. MAWLID AL-NABI  Birthday of the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon Him), ca. 570 C. E.

 

Mon 1st Nov All Saints Day | Christian   

Celebration of lives of all the saints, especially those who do not have a special day.

 

Tue 2nd Nov All Souls Day | Christian   

Day of prayer, remembrance and intercession for the dead.

 

Fri 19th Nov Birthday of Guru Nanak Dev Sahib | Sikh

Birthday of the founder of the Sikh religion.  

Sun 21st Nov Entry of the Mother of God in the Temple | Orthodox

 

Wed 24th Nov –

Thu 25th Nov

Day of the Covenant | Baha’i

Celebration of the covenant given in the last will and testament of Baha’u’llah.

 

 

Sun 28th Nov  – 

Mon 6th Dec

Hanukkah | Jewish 

Hanukkah is the Festival of Lights and marks the restoration of the temple by the Maccabees in 164 BCE.   

Sun 28th Nov –

Fri 24th Dec

 

Advent | Christian 

Period of four weeks in which Christians prepare for Christmas.

 

Sun 28th Nov –

Fri 24th Dec

 

Advent | Christian 

Period of four weeks in which Christians prepare for Christmas.

 

Tue 21st Dec Winter Solstice | Pagan

Northern Hemisphere

 

 

Sat 25th  Dec

Christmas Day | Christian * National holiday in the UK

The day when western Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus

Christ. Celebrated by Orthodox Christians on 7th January

Thu 6th Jan Epiphany | Christian

End of the 12 days of Christmas; celebrates visit of the three kings to baby Jesus; especially important to Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics.

 

Fri 14th Jan

 

Makar Sankranti | Hindu

Celebrates the sun’s journey into the northern hemisphere. One of the most important festivals of the Hindu calendar.  

Mon 10th Jan Bodhi Day | Buddhist

Celebration of the enlightenment of Buddha, ca. 596 B.C.E

Sun 16th Jan –

Mon 17th Jan

Tu Bishvat | Jewish

Tu Bishvat is the new year for trees

Tue 1st Feb –

Wed 2nd Feb

Half point between the winter solstice and Spring Equinor, celebrating new beginnings an purification as winter ends.
Tue 15th  Feb   Parinirvana (Nirvana Day) | Buddhist

Mahayana Buddhist festival marking the anniversary of Buddha’s death. Pure Land Buddhists call the festival “Nirvana Day”.

Tue 1st Feb

 

Chinese New Year | Confucian, Taoist, Buddhist

* Holiday with work restriction

People gather together for festive meals.

Tue 1st Mar Shrove Tuesday | Christian

Many Christian churches in the United Kingdom observe Shrove Tuesday as the last day before the fast for the Lent period.

 

Wed 2nd Mar  

Ash Wednesday | Christian

The first day of Lent for Western Christian churches. There are special church services on this day. Some Christians abstain from eating meat.  

Wed 2nd Mar  – Thu 14th

 

LENT | Christian

Period of preparation for Easter, usually 40 days before. Christians around the world observe in different ways. Some have strict fasting dedicating time for prayer and devotion and having very limited food diet.

 

Thu 17th Mar St. Patrick’s Day | Christian

Saint Patrick’s Day, or the Feast of Saint Patrick, is a cultural and religious celebration held on 17 March, the traditional death date of Saint Patrick, the foremost patron saint of Ireland.

 

 

 

Fri 25th Mar

The annunciation of the Mother of God | Orthodox

 

 

Wed 4th Mar

 

Departed Souls Day | Orthodox

 

Sat 19th Mar

 

Holi (Hola Mohalla) “Festival of Colours,” | Hindu

Hindus often sprinkle coloured water and powder on others and celebrate with bonfires and lights.

Sun 20th March     Spring Equinox | Pagan

Celebration of a renewal of life in spring.

Sun 20th Mar NAW-RUZ | Baha’i

Baha’i and Iranian New Year.

Thu 14th Apr Mahavir Jayanti |Jain

Celebrates the day of Mahavira’s birth.

Thu 14th Apr Maundy Thursday | Christian Thu 9th Apr

Also known as Holy Thursday, this day celebrates the institution of the Eucharist (or Holy Communion) at Jesus’ Last Supper.

 

 

Fri 15th Apr –  Sat 23rd Apr

Pesach (Passover) | Jewish * Holiday with work restriction The start of the season of Passover when Jews commemorate the liberation of the Children of Israel who were led out of Egypt by Moses.
 

Fri 15th Apr

 

Good Friday | Christian* National holiday in the UK  Good Friday commemorates the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Celebrated by Orthodox Christians also on 14th April.

Sun 17th Apr    Easter Sunday | Christian* National holiday in the UK

The most important Christian festival celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ.  Also Orthodox Christian Easter on 28th.

Thu 14th Apr   Vaisakhi |Sikh 

Sikh new year and harvest festival.

   

 

 

Date

 

SUMMER (May – August 2022)

Sat 2nd Apr – 

Sun 1st May   

 

(Tentative)

Ramadan | Muslim

*Fasting

The ninth month in the Islamic calendar; 30 days of strict fasting from sunrise to sundown in honour of the first revelations to the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon Him). Ramadan is an occasion to focus on faith through fasting and prayer, and is one of the most important Muslim holidays. Students and staff observing Ramadan will be fasting during the day (continuously for 30 days) and will likely have less stamina as a result.

 

Sat 2nd Apr – 

Sun 1st May   

 

(Tentative)

Ramadan | Muslim

*Fasting

The ninth month in the Islamic calendar; 30 days of strict fasting from sunrise to sundown in honour of the first revelations to the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be upon Him). Ramadan is an occasion to focus on faith through fasting and prayer, and is one of the most important Muslim holidays. Students and staff observing Ramadan will be fasting during the day (continuously for 30 days) and will likely have less stamina as a result.

 

Sun 1st May Belfane falls halfway between the Spring equinox and Summer Solstice. Celebrates the peak of Spring and the coming of summer.
Mon 2nd May  – 

Tue 3rd May

Eid al-Fitr | Muslim  * Holiday with work restriction

 

Eid al-Fitr means “break the fast”, and is the last day of Ramadan, marking the end of a month of fasting. Muslims often pray, exchange gifts, feast, and celebrate with friends and family. Staff are likely to request annual leave on this day, and such requests should be granted where possible.

 

Fri 6th May

 

Vesak, (‘Buddha Day’) | Buddhist

The most important of the Buddhist festivals. It celebrates the Buddha’s birthday, and, for some Buddhists, also marks his enlightenment and death.

Sat 4th June – 

Mon 6th June

 

Shavuot | Jewish * Holiday with work restriction

Shavuot is the second of three pilgrim festivals and it follows the Passover by 50 days. It is also known as the Festival of Weeks, the Feast of Weeks, or the Feast of the Harvest.

 

 

Sun 5th June

 

Pentecost (Whitsun) | Christian

The seventh Sunday after Easter, commemorating the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples and the birth of the Christian Church.

 

Thu 16th June  

Martyrdom of Guru Arjan Dev | Sikh  

(Nanakshahi calendar)

Guru Arjan Dev was the fifth Sikh Guru and the first Sikh martyr. He also compiled all of the past Gurus’ writings into one book, which is now the Sikh holy scripture: the Guru Granth Sahib.

 

 

Tue 21st June

 

Summer Solstice  |  Pagan, Wiccan, Druid  

A celebration of the longest day of the year and the beginning of summer. Marked by lighting to bonfires and watching the sun rise.

  Tue 21st June    World Humanist Day |

World Humanist Day is a Humanist holiday celebrated annually around the world on the June solstice, which usually falls on June 21. According to Humanists International, the day is a way of spreading awareness of Humanism as a philosophical life stance and means to effect change in the world.